project leader
Larry F
location
Multiple
(Multiple)
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A big step forward!!!

the project

Trees are amazing. They produce oxygen, clean the air, soak up storm water, cool our neighborhoods, and so much more. On a hot summer day, a neighborhood with a robust tree canopy will be as much as 10 degrees cooler than a neighborhood with too few trees (known as an Urban Heat Island).

Cincinnati has set a goal of 40% tree canopy or more in every neighborhood. 16 of Cincinnati's 52 neighborhoods currently fall short of that goal, including: Avondale (34%), Bond Hill (23%), Camp Washington (8%), Carthage (16%), Coryville (11%), East End (27%), Evanston (29%), Hartwell (31%), Linwood (20%), Lower Price Hill (18%), Mount Auburn (35%), Oakley (24%), Pleasant Ridge (34%), Queensgate (9%), Roselawn (22%), and Walnut Hills (30%).

Cincinnati Parks' ReLeaf program offers free trees to land owners for planting in the City. This year, Parks is prioritizing trees for shade deficient neighborhoods. Demand for the program has been so strong that Parks has run out of funds for trees, and there are many unfilled orders. $40 donated to this campaign will pay for 1 tree of 1" caliper size (trunk is 1 inch in diameter or larger, usually about 8 feet tall) to be purchased, delivered to the planting site, and planted in a shade deficient neighborhood. When we reach our goal of $10,000, there will be 250 new trees in Cincinnati, in the places where they are needed most.

the steps

Cincinnati Parks started taking orders for the ReLeaf Program on August 9th, and was fully subscribed by August 12th. Parks continues to take orders, subject to availability. They estimate that at least 250 trees will be needed to fulfill orders from priority neighborhoods. The final order for additional trees will be placed on October 1. The trees will be delivered and planted before the end of October.

why we're doing it

The Green Cincinnati Plan documents the increasing frequency and severity of heat waves in Cincinnati. Most people are surprised to learn that, of all natural disasters, heat waves cause by far the most fatalities. In Cincinnati, about 12,000 households live with no air conditioning, making these residents the most vulnerable to extreme heat. Sadly, the neighborhoods where people tend to live without air conditioning are the same ones that tend to be hotter than surrounding areas due to a lack of trees. The Green Cincinnati Plan has a list of strategies that Cincinnati will implement to reduce heat fatalities. One of the most important is planting more trees.

budget

250 trees at $40 per tree.

Labor and equipment to take orders, qualify sites, purchase trees and distribute them to sites is already covered by the Parks Department's ReLeaf Program



PROJECT FUNDING NEEDED = $10,000
ioby Platform Fee $35
ioby Donation Processing Fee (3%) $310
TOTAL TO RAISE = $10,345

 

updates

A big step forward!!!

The Green Cincinnati Fund has received a very generous gift of $2,000 from Tom and Cathy Crain to advance the ReLeaf campaign. That's 50 trees!!! Thank you, Tom and Cathy.

photos

This is where photos will go once we build flickr integration

donors

  • Julie Jones
  • Ron DeLyons
  • Steve Johns
  • Leslie Maloney
  • Nicole Gunderman
  • William Messer
  • Eric Gruenstein
  • Oliver Kroner
  • Brewster Rhoads
  • Anonymous